Sunday, May 17, 2009

White Chicken in a Thick Cashew Gravy

Around 7.00 in the night, have a glass of red wine.

There are quite a few things that I want to write about but right now it is difficult to remember all. In fact, after having had the chicken in cashew gravy, my mind has gotten even number. But that doesn’t stop me from writing about the chicken in cashew gravy.

Marinate a kg of chicken in 500 ml curd and ginger-garlic paste overnight. In two teaspoonfuls of olive oil, fry some finely chopped onions and cinnamon in a rice cooker until the onion turns brown. Pour the marinated chicken, add some sugar and salt, and close the lid. Let it cook for about 30 minutes. Keep checking the level of water because if you don’t add water, sometimes the gravy may get too dry. Add half a cup of water after every 15 minutes. After about 30 minutes, add the cashew paste (about 100 gms of cashew ground in milk to form a thick, white paste). Stir a little. Your white chicken in cashew paste is ready.

As Bengalis, we add a couple of potatoes in a kg of chicken. Just cut the potatoes in half and put them in with the chicken. They ensure your gravy is even thicker.

To serve with this, you need either gobindobhog rice, which is found only in West Bengal, CR Park (New Delhi), and most places in the US, or zeera samba rice, which is found in Bangalore. Both the varieties have small grains with a beautiful aroma that can waylay an otherwise determined hunger striker. Rumor has it that Karunanidhi recently had to break his half-day hunger strike after some supporter of Jayalalitha started cooking zeera rice in the vicinity.

Mix the two and eat more than your usual intake. Expect a little flatulence and a heavy feeling that starts with your eyelids. The dreams following such a meal are often rather primordial in nature. You may see yourself giving successful chase to some nubile nymphets. A closed deal like that in a dream can obviously result in a little bit of wetness, which is pardonable. But remember to start with a glass of red wine around 7.00 in the night.

Good night.

7 comments:

dippyblogs said...

Ki Anondo!
Great post. Gobindobhog - been ages since I had some. Basmati is what one sees everywhere. But the smell of gobindobhog is so... different!

Pinku said...

wow!!!

awesome....am almost tempted to go back home immediately and start the process ....btw which wine do u recommend...I know u said red...but which red?

Happily I do have gobindobhog at home too!!!!!

Oreen said...

the aroma of gobindobhog seems to be drawing bongs from all corners...

pinku, i am the last person to comment on wines. i can't even afford the cheap Indian reds. I have port, mostly, because it is a) sweet and b) affordable...

Piat d'or is an affordable French red wine... within about Rs 600 or so. You can of course have Sante, Vinsura, etc. But I wouldn't know really.

Pinku said...

Oreen....

I cant afford the more expensive ones either and also somehow dont even feel the need to...

really relish Port wine...No 7 from Nita's (got it in Goa) was divine.

Just wanted to know which one exactly u were having to reach the blissland mentioned in the post thats all.

Oreen said...

i have port from a frnd, Michael Sebastian. His mom makes wonderful port at home. Otherwise it is Golconda and Heritage, of course! The cheapest available... :)

Mampi said...

will try cooking it;
now that i m becoming the cooking types...
will have and serve it sans the wine-me being the boring punjabi.
bless the bongs.

Anonymous said...

Damn dude! Thanks for all the info! Much appreciated!please do not heat up any part
of the glass on your rig! BAD IDEA.